Introduction to II Chronicles

The books of I & II Chronicles is the third series (Samuel and Kings) that record the history of God’s people throughout the generations.  The chronicler is unknown, though some scholars believe it might have been Ezra the priest.  Chronicles was written during the post-exilic period when God’s people returned from Babylon.  It’s interesting to note that the book of Chronicles is the last book in the original Hebrew writings.  The intent of Chronicles was to encourage the people helping to rebuild their lives back in the land of Canaan.  In the midst of their return and questions about who they were, the chronicler would remind them of their identity and hopeful future.

Introduction to I Chronicles

The books of I & II Chronicles is the third series (Samuel and Kings) that record the history of God’s people throughout the generations.  The chronicler is unknown, though some scholars believe it might have been Ezra the priest.  Chronicles was written during the post-exilic period when God’s people returned from Babylon.  It’s interesting to note that the book of Chronicles is the last book in the original Hebrew writings.  The intent of Chronicles was to encourage the people helping to rebuild their lives back in the land of Canaan.  In the midst of their return and questions about who they were, the chronicler would remind them of their identity and hopeful future.  Much of the focus of Chronicles is on King David and the kingdom of Judah.

Introduction to I Corinthians

The Apostle Paul is the author of the two letters that were written to the Corinthian church.  Paul had spent some considerable time ministering to those in Corinth (1 ½ years).  He wrote this letter on his 3rd missionary journey while he was in the city of Ephesus.  The city of Corinth was a Roman colony and the capital of the province of Achaia.  It was a trading port city filled with much commercial activities and a diverse culture (Jews, Romans, Greeks).  The population was nearly 600,000 people!  It was cosmopolitan city and housed the famous temple of Aphrodite.  Even in a era of open sexual immorality, Corinth had quite the reputation.  The young Christians at Corinth struggled from the worldly influence around them.  Paul wrote the letters to the Corinthians to exhort them how to live right before God.  He addresses practical issues to give them wisdom regarding some of their specific struggles and circumstances.  The Corinthians struggled with being egocentric rather than putting Christ first.

Paul's 1st and 2nd Missionary JourneyCorinth

Introduction – II Kings

The book of II Kings continues the story line from I Kings.  Though Jewish tradition named Jeremiah as the author, biblical scholars have since realized that this was not possible for the ending of the book transpired in exile in Babylon (Jeremiah ended his last days in Egypt).  Originally, I & II King were one book in the Hebrew bible known as Kings.  Both I & II Kings covers a period of nearly four centuries beginning with the close of King David’s reign to the release of King Jehoiachin from Babylon.  It was probably written around 561-538 B.C.  I & II Kings covers the history of Israel’s King from united kingdom, divided kingdom, and then exile.  Because of the kings failures, God would raise up prophets to warn them of impending consequences.   Though God’s people had failed to live up to their promises, God would not forget his promise to King David.

Introduction – I Kings

The book of I Kings continues the story line from II Samuel.  Though Jewish tradition named Jeremiah as the author, biblical scholars have since realized that this was not possible for the ending of the book transpired in exile in Babylon (Jeremiah ended his last days in Egypt).  Originally, I & II King were one book in the Hebrew bible known as Kings.  Both I & II Kings covers a period of nearly four centuries beginning with the close of King David’s reign to the release of King Jehoiachin from Babylon.  It was probably written around 561-538 B.C.  I & II Kings covers the history of Israel’s King from united kingdom, divided kingdom, and then exile.  Because of the kings failures, God would raise up prophets to warn them of impending consequences.   Though God’s people had failed to live up to their promises, God would not forget his promise to King David.

Introduction – Romans

Rome was the center of the Roman Empire and an amazing city! It is widely believed that Paul wrote this letter to Rome on his third missionary journey while he was in Corinth. Though Paul did not plant the church in Rome, his influence certainly had shaped it.  The Gospel had reached Rome, but there were many young Christians.  Paul wrote this letter to encourage and expound upon deeper knowledge of the Lord.  There were both Gentile and Jewish Christians in Rome, but they were predominately Gentile.  As we read Romans, you will see quite an emphasis on a very clear understanding of the Gospel!  The book of Romans is a wonderful foundation in growing in our faith and sharing a clear message of the Gospel to others!

Rome

Introduction – II Samuel

Originally in the Hebrew text, the book of Samuel was not divided.  It wasn’t until the Greek translation (LXX) that they split the book in I Samuel and II Samuel.  Though scholars are unsure of the date this was written, we know that it was after divided kingdom (Israel and Judah) in 931 B.C.  The events in I & II Samuel transpired with Samuel (1105 B.C.) to the last words of David (971 B.C.).  Samuel was Israel’s last judge when there was no earthly king.  There are three main characters in I Samuel: Samuel, Saul, and David.  The time when Samuel was born, was a desolate time for Israel spiritually.  The end of the book of Judges is a sobering reminder of Israel’s condition.  As we travel in I Samuel, we will see God’s sovereignty reign over His people.  Though Israel was not perfect, God’s covenant promises would be renewed with King David.

Introduction – Acts

The book of Acts gives us tremendous insight to the origins of the church!  It gives answers to how the Holy Spirit helped the believers contend with their faith after the ascension of Jesus.   Though the author is not named, it is highly likely that Luke is the author for the letter was written to Theophilus.  Luke (the physician) was Paul’s close associate and friend who traveled with him and was also the author of the third synoptic Gospel.  He probably had written Acts in the early 60’s (61-63 AD).  The books covers three decades of the spreading of the Gospel and the growth of the church.  It was not an easy time for the early believers, for there was much persecution as Jesus had previously warned them.

Introduction – I Samuel

Originally in the Hebrew text, the book of Samuel was not divided.  It wasn’t until the Greek translation (LXX) that they split the book in I Samuel and II Samuel.  Though scholars are unsure of the date this was written, we know that it was after divided kingdom (Israel and Judah) in 931 B.C.  The events in I & II Samuel transpired with Samuel (1105 B.C.) to the last words of David (971 B.C.).  Samuel was Israel’s last judge when there was no earthly king.  There are three main characters in I Samuel: Samuel, Saul, and David.  The time when Samuel was born, was a desolate time for Israel spiritually.  The end of the book of Judges is a sobering reminder of Israel’s condition.  As we travel in I Samuel, we will see God’s sovereignty reign over His people.  Though Israel was not perfect, God’s covenant promises would be renewed with King David.

Introduction – John

The Gospel of John is the most unique out of the four Gospels.  The Apostle John (the fisherman) wrote his gospel over thirty years after the other three (Matthew, Mark & Luke) were written.  Consider this Gospel a sort of commentary and response to those detractors who questioned who Jesus really was.  The Gospel of John was written the 90’s A.D.  The audience whom John wrote his letter was to apply to all.  He wanted to emphasize Jesus as the Son of God and that salvation came through Jesus (John 20:31).  The word “believe” is mentioned approximately 100 times to reinforce saving faith in the Christian life.  Most scholars believe John wrote his gospel in Ephesus before the epistles and the book of Revelation.  John is known for recording Jesus’ seven “I Am” statements identifying who He is.